Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Income Taxes

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Income Taxes
6 Months Ended
Aug. 04, 2018
Income Taxes  
Income Taxes

9.  Income Taxes

 

In December 2017, the U.S. enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Reform Act”). The changes included in the Tax Reform Act are broad and complex, including, but not limited to reducing the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% effective January 1, 2018.  Our federal income tax expense for fiscal 2018 is based on the new rate. 

 

Our effective income tax rate decreased to 16.7% for the second quarter of 2018 from 32.5% for the second quarter of 2017 primarily from enactment of the Tax Reform Act as well as the release of $3.1 million of state valuation allowances.

 

Our effective income tax rate decreased to 18.4% for the first six months of 2018 from 35.0% for the first six months of 2017 primarily from enactment of the Tax Reform Act, the release of $3.1 million of state valuation allowances and anniversarying last year’s $2.2 million of tax deficiencies related to the vesting of stock-based awards recorded in the first six months of 2017 resulting from the adoption of new accounting guidance related to stock-based compensation.

 

Shortly after the Tax Reform Act was enacted, the SEC issued Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, Income Tax Accounting Implications of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“SAB 118”) which provides guidance on accounting for the Tax Reform Act’s impact. SAB 118 provides a measurement period, which in no case should extend beyond one year from the Tax Reform Act enactment date, during which a company acting in good faith may complete the accounting for the impacts of the Tax Reform Act. In accordance with SAB 118, a company must reflect the income tax effects of the Tax Reform Act in the reporting period in which the accounting is complete. To the extent that a company’s accounting for certain income tax effects of the Tax Reform Act is incomplete, a company can determine a reasonable estimate for those effects and record a provisional estimate in the financial statements in the first reporting period in which a reasonable estimate can be determined.

At the end of fiscal 2017, we recorded a provisional discrete net tax benefit of $0.3 million related to the Tax Reform Act as well as a provisional estimate of incremental withholding liabilities on our investment in foreign earnings totaling $17.3 million as we no longer intend to permanently reinvest our foreign earnings from Canada. 

 

During the first six months of 2018, there have been no material updates to these provisional amounts. While we have made a reasonable estimate of the impact of the Tax Reform Act, we are continuing to finalize the consequences of tax reform, including analyzing additional information related to the Tax Reform Act as supplemental legislation, regulatory guidance, or evolving technical interpretations become available.  We expect that our transition tax and the temporary differences that existed on the date of enactment will be presumed final once our federal return is filed. 

 

Additionally, we are currently undergoing several audits; however, we currently do not believe these audits will result in any material charge to tax expense in the future.