Annual report pursuant to section 13 and 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

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Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Jan. 28, 2012
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Organization and Business

Organization and Business — The Men’s Wearhouse, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) is a specialty apparel retailer offering suits, suit separates, sport coats, slacks, sportswear, outerwear, dress shirts, shoes and accessories for men and tuxedo rentals. We offer our products and services through multiple channels including The Men’s Wearhouse, Men’s Wearhouse and Tux, K&G, Moores Clothing for Men and on the internet at www.menswearhouse.com and www.kgstores.com. Our stores are located throughout the United States and Canada and carry a wide selection of brand name and private label merchandise. In addition, we offer our customers a variety of services, including alterations and our loyalty program, and most of our K&G stores offer ladies’ career apparel, sportswear and accessories, including shoes, and children’s apparel. We follow the standard fiscal year of the retail industry, which is a 52-week or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31. Fiscal year 2011 ended on January 28, 2012, fiscal year 2010 ended on January 29, 2011 and fiscal year 2009 ended on January 30, 2010. Fiscal years 2011, 2010 and 2009 each included 52 weeks.

We also conduct corporate apparel and uniform operations through Twin Hill in the United States and Dimensions and Alexandra in the United Kingdom and, in the Houston, Texas area, we conduct retail dry cleaning and laundry operations through MW Cleaners.

Principles of Consolidation

Principles of Consolidation — The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of The Men’s Wearhouse, Inc. and its subsidiaries. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in the consolidated financial statements.

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates — The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Our most significant estimates and assumptions, as discussed in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” included herein, are those relating to revenue recognition, inventories, impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill, amortization of the cost of our tuxedo rental product, our estimated liabilities for self-insured portions of our workers’ compensation and employee health benefit costs, our estimates relating to income taxes and our operating lease accounting.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and Cash Equivalents — Cash and cash equivalents includes all cash in banks, cash on hand and all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less.

Accounts Receivable

Accounts Receivable — Accounts receivable consists of our receivables from third-party credit card providers and other trade receivables, net of an allowance for uncollectible accounts of $0.8 million and $0.9 million in fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively. Collectability is reviewed regularly and the allowance is adjusted as necessary. Our other trade receivables consist primarily of receivables from our corporate apparel segment customers.

Inventories

Inventories — Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined based on the average cost method. Our inventory cost also includes estimated buying and distribution costs (warehousing, freight, hangers and merchandising costs) associated with the inventory, with the balance of such costs included in cost of sales. Buying and distribution costs are allocated to inventory based on the ratio of annual product purchases to inventory cost. We make assumptions, based primarily on historical experience, as to items in our inventory that may be damaged, obsolete or salable only at marked down prices and reduce the cost of inventory to reflect the market value of these items.

In the third quarter of fiscal 2010, we changed the method of determining cost under the lower of cost or market inventory valuation method used for our K&G brand (representing approximately 23% of our inventory) from the retail inventory method to the average cost method. We believe the average cost method is preferable over the retail inventory method because it results in greater precision in the determination of cost of sales and inventories. Additionally, this change resulted in a consistent inventory valuation method for all of our inventories.

We recorded the cumulative effect of the change in accounting principle retrospectively as of February 1, 2009. The cumulative effect of this change in accounting principle as of February 1, 2009 was an increase in inventory of $2.2 million, a decrease in deferred tax assets of $0.9 million and a net increase in retained earnings of $1.3 million.

Property and Equipment

Property and Equipment — Property and equipment are stated at cost. Normal repairs and maintenance costs are charged to earnings as incurred and additions and major improvements are capitalized. The cost of assets retired or otherwise disposed of and the related allowances for depreciation are eliminated from the accounts in the period of disposal and the resulting gain or loss is credited or charged to earnings.

Buildings are depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives of 20 to 25 years. Depreciation of leasehold improvements is computed on the straight-line method over the term of the lease, which is generally five to ten years based on the initial lease term plus first renewal option periods that are reasonably assured, or the useful life of the assets, whichever is shorter. Furniture, fixtures and equipment are depreciated using primarily the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives of three to 25 years.

Depreciation expense was $72.6 million, $73.6 million and $83.9 million for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets — Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and identifiable intangibles with finite useful lives, are periodically evaluated for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Assets are grouped and evaluated for impairment at the lowest level of which there are identifiable cash flows, which is generally at a store level. Assets are reviewed using factors including, but not limited to, the Company’s future operating plans and projected cash flows. The determination of whether impairment has occurred is based on an estimate of undiscounted future cash flows directly related to the assets, compared to the carrying value of the assets. If the sum of the undiscounted future cash flows of the assets does not exceed the carrying value of the assets, full or partial impairment may exist. If the asset carrying amount exceeds its fair value, an impairment charge is recognized in the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value of the asset. Fair value is determined using an income approach, which requires discounting the estimated future cash flows associated with the asset. Estimating future cash flows requires management to make assumptions and to apply judgment, including forecasting future sales, costs and useful lives of assets. Significant judgment is also involved in selecting the appropriate discount rate to be applied in determining the estimated fair value of an asset. Changes to our key assumptions related to future performance, market conditions and other economic factors can significantly affect our impairment evaluation. For example, unanticipated adverse market conditions can cause individual stores to become unprofitable and can result in an impairment charge for the property and equipment assets in those stores.

During fiscal 2009, we recognized retail segment pretax non-cash asset impairment charges of $19.5 million related to store assets for 145 Men’s Wearhouse and Tux stores and 12 K&G stores. During fiscal 2010, we recognized retail segment pretax non-cash asset impairment charges of $5.9 million related to store assets for 49 Men’s Wearhouse and Tux stores, four K&G stores and three Men’s Wearhouse stores. During fiscal 2011, we recognized retail segment pretax non-cash asset impairment charges of $2.0 million related to store assets for 26 Men’s Wearhouse and Tux stores and two K&G stores.

The pretax asset impairment charges related to the store assets for the Men’s Wearhouse and Tux stores were $14.4 million in fiscal 2009, $3.6 million in fiscal 2010 and $1.4 million in fiscal 2011 and resulted mainly from a consumer driven shifting of rental revenues from the rental stores to our Men’s Wearhouse stores located in close proximity (one mile or less). The pretax asset impairment charges for the K&G stores of $5.1 million in 2009 and $1.9 million in 2010 were the result primarily of sales declines that started in 2007 and continued through fiscal 2010 caused mainly by the downturn experienced by the U.S. economy. In fiscal 2011, we recognized pretax asset impairment charges of $0.6 million for two K&G stores that are still in operation. We also recognized pretax asset impairment charges in fiscal 2010 of $0.4 million for three Men’s Wearhouse stores, one of which is still in operation at the end of fiscal 2011. No asset impairment charges were recognized for any Men’s Wearhouse stores in fiscal 2009 or 2011.

Changes to our key assumptions related to future performance, market conditions and other economic factors could result in future impairment charges for stores or other long-lived assets where the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets — Goodwill and other intangible assets are initially recorded at their fair values. Trademarks, tradenames, customer relationships and other identifiable intangible assets with finite useful lives are amortized to expense over their estimated useful lives of three to 20 years using the straight-line method and are periodically evaluated for impairment as discussed in the “Impairment of Long-Lived Assets” section above. Identifiable intangible assets with an indefinite useful life, including goodwill, are not amortized but are evaluated annually as of our fiscal year end for impairment. A more frequent evaluation is performed if events or circumstances indicate that impairment could have occurred. Such events or circumstances could include, but are not limited to, significant negative industry or economic trends, unanticipated changes in the competitive environment, decisions to significantly modify or dispose of operations and a significant sustained decline in the market price of our stock.

Goodwill, which totaled $87.8 million at January 28, 2012, represents the excess cost of businesses acquired over the fair value of the identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed in prior business combinations. For purposes of our goodwill impairment evaluation, the reporting units are our operating brands identified in Note 14. Goodwill has been assigned to the reporting units based on prior business combinations related to the brands. The goodwill impairment evaluation is performed in two steps. The first step is intended to determine if potential impairment exists and is performed by comparing each reporting unit’s fair value to its carrying value, including goodwill. If the carrying value of a reporting unit exceeds its estimated fair value, goodwill is considered potentially impaired, and we must complete the second step of the testing to determine the amount of any impairment. The second step requires an allocation of the reporting unit’s first step estimated fair value to the individual assets and liabilities of the reporting unit in the same manner as if the reporting unit was being acquired in a business combination. Any excess of the estimated fair value over the amounts allocated to the individual assets and liabilities represents the implied fair value of goodwill for the reporting unit. If the implied fair value of goodwill is less than the recorded goodwill, we would recognize an impairment charge for the difference.

In our step one process, we estimate the fair value of our reporting units using a combined income and market comparable approach. Our income approach uses projected future cash flows that are discounted using a weighted-average cost of capital analysis that reflects current market conditions. The market comparable approach primarily considers market price multiples of comparable companies and applies those price multiples to certain key drivers of the reporting unit. We engage an independent valuation firm to assist us in estimating the fair value of our reporting units.

Management judgment is a significant factor in the goodwill impairment evaluation process. The computations require management to make estimates and assumptions. Critical assumptions that are used as part of these evaluations include:

 

   

The potential future cash flows of the reporting unit.    The income approach relies on the timing and estimates of future cash flows. The projections use management’s estimates of economic and market conditions over the projected period, including growth rates in revenue, gross margin and expense. The cash flows are based on the Company’s most recent business operating plans and various growth rates have been assumed for years beyond the current business plan period. We believe that the assumptions and rates used in our 2011 impairment evaluation are reasonable; however, variations in the assumptions and rates could result in significantly different estimates of fair value.

 

   

Selection of an appropriate discount rate.    The income approach requires the selection of an appropriate discount rate, which is based on a weighted average cost of capital analysis. The discount rate is affected by changes in short-term interest rates and long-term yield as well as variances in the typical capital structure of marketplace participants. Given current economic conditions, it is possible that the discount rate will fluctuate in the near term. The weighted average cost of capital used to discount the cash flows for our reporting units ranged from 13.0% to 15.5% for the 2011 analysis.

 

   

Selection of comparable companies within the industry.    For purposes of the market comparable approach, valuations were determined by calculating average price multiples of relevant key drivers from a group of companies that are comparable to the reporting units being analyzed and applying those price multiples to the key drivers of the reporting unit. While the market price multiple is not an assumption, a presumption that it provides an indicator of the value of the reporting unit is inherent in the valuation. The determination of the market comparable also involves a degree of judgment. Earnings multiples of 5.0 to 7.5 were used for the 2011 analysis for our operating brands including Men’s Wearhouse, K&G, Moores, MW Cleaners and our UK-based operations. A revenue multiple of 1.0 was used for the 2011 analysis for our Twin Hill operating brand.

As discussed above, the fair values of reporting units in 2011 were determined using a combined income and market comparable approach. We believe these two approaches are appropriate valuation techniques and we generally weight the two values equally as an estimate of reporting unit fair value for the purposes of our impairment testing. However, we may weigh one value more heavily than the other when conditions merit doing so. The fair value derived from the weighting of these two methods provided appropriate valuations that, in aggregate, reasonably reconciled to our market capitalization, taking into account observable control premiums. Therefore, we used the valuations in evaluating goodwill for possible impairment and determined that none of our goodwill was impaired.

The goodwill impairment evaluation process requires management to make estimates and assumptions with regard to the fair value of the reporting units. Actual values may differ significantly from these judgments, particularly if there are significant adverse changes in the operating environment for our reporting units. Sustained declines in the Company’s market capitalization could also increase the risk of goodwill impairment. Such occurrences could result in future goodwill impairment charges that would, in turn, negatively impact the Company’s results of operations; however, any such goodwill impairments would be non-cash charges that would not affect our cash flows or compliance with our current debt covenants.

No goodwill impairment was identified in fiscal 2011, 2010 or 2009.

Tuxedo Rental Product

Tuxedo Rental Product — Tuxedo rental product is amortized to cost of sales based on the cost of each unit rented. The cost of each unit rented is estimated based on the number of times the unit is expected to be rented and the average cost of the rental product. Lost, damaged and retired rental product is also charged to cost of sales. Tuxedo rental product is amortized to expense generally over a two to three year period. We make assumptions, based primarily on historical experience and information obtained from tuxedo rental industry sources, as to the number of times each unit can be rented. Amortization expense was $28.9 million, $33.5 million and $37.2 million for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Derivative Financial Instruments

Derivative Financial Instruments — Derivative financial instruments are recorded in the consolidated balance sheet at fair value as other current assets or accrued expenses and other current liabilities. The Company has not elected to apply hedge accounting to our derivative financial instruments. The gain or loss on derivative financial instruments is recorded in cost of sales in the consolidated statements of earnings. Refer to Note 13 for further information regarding our derivative instruments.

Self-Insurance

Self-Insurance — We self-insure significant portions of our workers’ compensation and employee medical costs. We estimate our liability for future payments under these programs based on historical experience and various assumptions as to participating employees, health care costs, number of claims and other factors, including industry trends and information provided to us by our insurance broker. We also use actuarial estimates. If the number of claims or the costs associated with those claims were to increase significantly over our estimates, additional charges to earnings could be necessary to cover required payments.

Sabbatical Leave

Sabbatical Leave — We recognize compensation expense associated with a sabbatical leave or other similar benefit arrangement over the requisite service period during which an employee earns the benefit. The accrued liability for sabbatical leave, which is included in accrued expenses and other current liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets, was $11.1 million and $9.9 million as of fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Income Taxes

Income Taxes — Income taxes are accounted for using the asset and liability method. Deferred tax liabilities or assets are established for temporary differences between financial and tax reporting bases and subsequently adjusted to reflect changes in enacted tax rates expected to be in effect when the temporary differences reverse. The deferred tax assets are reduced, if necessary, by a valuation allowance to the extent future realization of those tax benefits is uncertain.

 

The tax benefit from an uncertain tax position is recognized only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such positions are then measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon settlement. Interest and/or penalties related to uncertain tax positions are recognized in income tax expense. See Note 5 for further information regarding income taxes.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue Recognition — Clothing product revenue is recognized at the time of sale and delivery of merchandise, net of actual sales returns and a provision for estimated sales returns, and excludes sales taxes. Revenues from tuxedo rental, alteration and other services are recognized upon completion of the services.

We present all non-income government-assessed taxes (sales, use and value added taxes) collected from our customers and remitted to governmental agencies on a net basis (excluded from net sales) in our consolidated financial statements. The government-assessed taxes are recorded in accrued expenses and other current liabilities until they are remitted to the government agency.

Gift Cards and Gift Card Breakage

Gift Cards and Gift Card Breakage — Proceeds from the sale of gift cards are recorded as a liability and are recognized as net sales from products and services when the cards are redeemed. Our gift cards do not have an expiration date. Prior to the second quarter of 2009, all unredeemed gift card proceeds were reflected as a liability until escheated in accordance with applicable laws and we did not recognize any income from unredeemed gift cards. During the second quarter of 2009, we entered into an agreement with an unrelated third party who became the issuer of the Company’s gift cards and assumed the existing liability for which there were no currently existing claims under unclaimed property statutes. The Company is no longer the primary obligor for the third party issued gift cards and is therefore not subject to claims under unclaimed property statutes as the agreement effectively transfers the escheatment liability for unredeemed gift cards to the third party. Accordingly, beginning with the second quarter of 2009, we recognize income from breakage of gift cards when the likelihood of redemption of the gift card is remote. We determine our gift card breakage rate based upon historical redemption patterns. Based on this historical information, the likelihood of a gift card remaining unredeemed can be determined 36 months after the gift card is issued. At that time, breakage income is recognized for those cards for which the likelihood of redemption is deemed to be remote and for which there is no legal obligation for us to remit the value of such unredeemed gift cards to any relevant jurisdictions. Gift card breakage income is recorded as other operating income and is classified as a reduction of “Selling, general and administrative expenses” in our consolidated statement of earnings. Pretax breakage income, including a cumulative adjustment of $3.1 million recorded in the second quarter of 2009, of $5.0 million was recognized during fiscal 2009. Pretax breakage income of $1.4 million and $1.8 million was recognized during fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively. Gift card breakage estimates are reviewed on a quarterly basis.

Loyalty Program

Loyalty Program — We maintain a customer loyalty program in our Men’s Wearhouse, Men’s Wearhouse and Tux and Moores stores in which customers receive points for purchases. Points are equivalent to dollars spent on a one-to-one basis, excluding any sales tax dollars. Upon reaching 500 points, customers are issued a $50 rewards certificate which they may redeem for purchases at our Men’s Wearhouse, Men’s Wearhouse and Tux or Moores stores. Generally, reward certificates earned must be redeemed no later than six months from the date of issuance. We accrue the estimated costs of the anticipated certificate redemptions when the certificates are issued and charge such costs to cost of goods sold. Redeemed certificates are recorded as markdowns when redeemed and no revenue is recognized for the redeemed certificate amounts. The estimate of costs associated with the loyalty program requires us to make assumptions related to the cost of product or services to be provided to customers when the certificates are redeemed as well as redemption rates. The accrued liability for loyalty program reward certificates, which is included in accrued expenses and other current liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets, was $6.5 million and $7.6 million as of fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Vendor Allowances

Vendor Allowances — Vendor allowances received are recognized as a reduction of the cost of the merchandise purchased.

Shipping and Handling Costs

Shipping and Handling Costs — All shipping and handling costs for product sold are recognized as cost of goods sold.

Operating Leases

Operating Leases — Operating leases relate primarily to stores and generally contain rent escalation clauses, rent holidays, contingent rent provisions and occasionally leasehold incentives. Rent expense for operating leases is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease, which is generally five to ten years based on the initial lease term plus first renewal option periods that are reasonably assured. Rent expense for stores is included in cost of sales as a part of occupancy cost and other rent is included in selling, general and administrative expenses. The lease terms commence when we take possession with the right to control use of the leased premises and, for stores, is generally 60 days prior to the date rent payments begin. Rental costs associated with ground or building operating leases that are incurred during a construction period are recognized as rental expense.

Deferred rent that results from recognition of rent expense on a straight-line basis is included in other liabilities. Landlord incentives received for reimbursement of leasehold improvements are recorded as deferred rent and amortized as a reduction to rent expense over the term of the lease. Contingent rentals are generally based on percentages of sales and are recognized as store rent expense as they accrue.

Advertising

Advertising — Advertising costs are expensed as incurred or, in the case of media production costs, when the commercial first airs. Advertising expenses were $84.4 million, $91.5 million and $82.0 million in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

New Store Costs

New Store Costs — Promotion and other costs associated with the opening of new stores are expensed as incurred.

Store Closures and Relocations

Store Closures and Relocations — Costs associated with store closures or relocations are charged to expense when the liability is incurred. When we close or relocate a store, we record a liability for the present value of estimated unrecoverable cost, which is substantially made up of the remaining net lease obligation.

Share-Based Compensation

Share-Based Compensation — In recognizing share-based compensation, we follow the provisions of the authoritative guidance regarding share-based awards. This guidance establishes fair value as the measurement objective in accounting for stock awards and requires the application of a fair value based measurement method in accounting for compensation cost, which is recognized over the requisite service period.

We use the Black-Scholes option pricing model to estimate the fair value of stock options on the date of grant. The fair value of restricted stock and deferred stock units is determined based on the number of shares granted and the quoted price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant. The value of the portion of the award that is ultimately expected to vest is recognized as expense over the requisite service period. For grants that are subject to graded vesting over a service period, we recognize expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award.

Share-based compensation expense recognized for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009 was $13.8 million, $11.9 million and $10.2 million, respectively. Total income tax benefit recognized in net earnings for share-based compensation arrangements was $5.4 million, $4.6 million and $3.9 million for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Refer to Note 9 for additional disclosures regarding share-based compensation.

Foreign Currency Translation

Foreign Currency Translation — Assets and liabilities of foreign subsidiaries are translated into U.S. dollars at the exchange rates in effect at each balance sheet date. Equity is translated at applicable historical exchange rates. Income, expense and cash flow items are translated at average exchange rates during the year. Resulting translation adjustments are reported as a separate component of comprehensive income.

Comprehensive Income

Comprehensive Income — Comprehensive income includes all changes in equity during the period presented that result from transactions and other economic events other than transactions with shareholders.

Noncontrolling Interest

Noncontrolling Interest — Noncontrolling interest in our consolidated balance sheets represents the proportionate share of equity attributable to the minority shareholders of our consolidated United Kingdom subsidiaries. Noncontrolling interest is adjusted each period to reflect the allocation of comprehensive income to or the absorption of comprehensive losses by the noncontrolling interest.

Earnings per share

Earnings per share — We calculate earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders using the two-class method in accordance with the guidance for determining whether instruments granted in share-based payment transactions are participating securities, which provides that unvested share-based payment awards that contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents (whether paid or unpaid) are participating securities and shall be included in the computation of earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders pursuant to the two-class method. Refer to Note 3 for disclosures regarding earnings per common share attributable to common shareholders.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recent Accounting Pronouncements — In September 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued updated guidance regarding testing goodwill for impairment. The updated guidance will allow an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. Under this amendment, an entity would not be required to calculate the fair value of a reporting unit unless the entity determines, based on a qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that its fair value is less than its carrying amount. The amendment includes a number of events and circumstances for an entity to consider in conducting the qualitative assessment. The amended guidance is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this update will only impact our testing of goodwill for impairment and will have no impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. We are currently evaluating the impact of this updated guidance on our goodwill impairment testing process.

In June 2011, the FASB issued updated guidance regarding the presentation of comprehensive income. The updated guidance allows an entity the option to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. The update eliminates the option to present the components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders’ equity. The update does not change the items that must be reported in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. In December 2011, the FASB issued a “Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments of the Presentation of Reclassification of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.” This defers only the changes that relate to the presentation of reclassification adjustments on the face of the financial statements where the components of net income and the components of other comprehensive income are presented. These amendments are to be applied retrospectively and are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this update will only impact the presentation of comprehensive income in our consolidated financial statements.

In May 2011, the FASB updated the guidance regarding certain accounting and disclosure requirements related to fair value measurements. The updated guidance amends U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) to create more commonality with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) by changing some of the wording used to describe requirements for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value measurements. This update is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is not permitted. We do not expect the adoption of this update to have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.